Why no lemons in Cancun?

Discussion in 'Living in Cancun & Riviera Maya' started by CancunTom, Sep 27, 2007.

  1. Greta

    Greta Guest

    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    Love the pic.... I lime Lemon with certain things too, and i've yet to see one in Cancun.. I'm puzzled with the rest of you.. Lime will have to work for me I guess...
     
  2. Isla Zina

    Isla Zina Regular Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2007
    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Isla Mujeres
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0
    They are called limones persa and are often with the other big limones. Look for the nipple. In a paper bag, these will ripen up to a nice yellow and taste very much like lemons! They are not prized here, so the only way I have ever gotten them is by the grower's accident.
     
  3. DVR63

    DVR63 Newbie Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2014
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    GA
    Ratings:
    +5 / 0
    Steve, headed down on August 31st. My wife struggles without lemons in her vodka. How is that tree coming along? :)
     
  4. Steve

    Steve Administrator Owner

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2003
    Messages:
    15,518
    Likes Received:
    1,591
    Location:
    Cancun
    Ratings:
    +1,952 / 12
    We've moved house twice since then and left it behind. I expect it's about ready now since this thread is 10 years old :)

    However yellow lemons are a lot easier to get hold of nowadays, although still not everywhere.
     
  5. canukcun

    canukcun Enthusiast Registered Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2012
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0
    Source WIKIPEDIA

    For several decades, since at least the 1950s, Mexico has been the world's largest producer and exporter of limes,[1][2][3][4] and especially of lime oil.[2][5]

    The two popular varieties of limes grown in Mexico are the Mexican or Key lime (Citrus aurantifolia) and the Persian lime(Citrus latifolia, simply called "lime" in the US); the former is of Indo–Malayan origin introduced in Mexico by the Spaniards after the 1520s,[6] while the latter, also called the Tahiti lime, was introduced from US.

    See also Spanish-Speakers' Citrus Struggle: The Confusing Debate Over How to Say Lemon/Lime en Español. Try asking for a yellow lemon.... Or why not consider growing Tips For Growing Lemons In The Garden Or Indoors.
    LEMON


    See also The lemon, Citrus limon (L.) Osbeck, is a species of small evergreen tree in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, native to Asia.
    Lemons entered Europe near southern Italy no later than the second century AD, during the time of Ancient Rome.[2] However, they were not widely cultivated. They were later introduced to Persia and then to Iraq and Egypt around 700 AD.[2] The lemon was first recorded in literature in a 10th-century Arabic treatise on farming, and was also used as an ornamental plant in early Islamic gardens.[2] It was distributed widely throughout the Arab world and the Mediterranean region between 1000 and 1150.[2]

    The first substantial cultivation of lemons in Europe began in Genoa in the middle of the 15th century. The lemon was later introduced to the Americas in 1493 when Christopher Columbus brought lemon seeds to Hispaniola on his voyages. Spanish conquest throughout the New World helped spread lemon seeds. It was mainly used as an ornamental plant and for medicine.[2] In the 19th century, lemons were increasingly planted in Florida and California.[2]

    VERSUS LIME
    This particular cultivar is a citrus hybrid, likely Citrus micrantha × Citrus medica (a papeda-citron cross).[8][9][10][11]

    C. aurantiifolia is native to Southeast Asia. Its apparent path of introduction was through the Middle East to North Africa, then to Sicily and Andalucia and via Spanish explorers to the West Indies, including the Florida Keys. From the Caribbean, lime cultivation spread to tropical and subtropical North America, including Mexico, Florida, and later California.

    Since the North American Free Trade Agreement came into effect, many Key limes on the US market are grown in Mexico, Central America and South America. They are also grown in Texas, Florida, and California.


    Do Lemons & Limes Grow on the Same Tree? | Hunker. "If you pluck some other kinds of fruits from their trees before those fruits are ripe, it takes only a little patience until they ripen. The same maneuver with a lemon will buy you disappointment. Lemons ripen on the tree or not at all. So getting your harvest timing right is critical."



    "The Mexican lime’s main ripening season is between August and December. Mexican limes often ripen year-round, fruiting in late winter and spring as well as the main ripening period in summer through early winter.
    You can pick limes right as they are turning light green. If the limes are not quite ripe when they fall off the tree, you may ripen them indoors, leaving them out at room temperature until they attain the desired ripeness." I am guessing most restaurants won't want to store fruit that is prone to spoiling after a day or two. The lime is much longer lasting than the lemon. I am guessing some bars would have lemons. I am also guessing higher star dining locations will have lemons over limes because of plate price markup covering fruit loss.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2017